BASF’s new VP-126 Power-Fill ultraviolet (UV) primer, which was originally developed for use in automotive refinishing, is now being used for fixing isolated defects in the automotive OEM coating process. With this new primer, an auto body with a tiny mar no longer needs to go back through the entire coating process, but instead can be touched up precisely at the site of the flaw, resulting in time and cost savings.

BASF’s new VP-126 Power-Fill ultraviolet (UV) primer, which was originally developed for use in automotive refinishing, is now being used for fixing isolated defects in the automotive OEM coating process. With this new primer, an auto body with a tiny mar no longer needs to go back through the entire coating process, but instead can be touched up precisely at the site of the flaw, resulting in time and cost savings.

The implementation of the new primer stems from a collaboration between BASF Coatings and General Motors paint engineers. The GM engineers were looking for a high build, corrosion-resistant primer that could be used to repair isolated defects. In the automotive refinish business, touching up minor defects is routine. Together with GM, BASF evaluated its UV-curable primer and determined it could provide significant benefits for the automotive OEM coating process.

The primer is applied to an isolated defect in one or two coats and is cured in just a few minutes with an ultraviolet light. Next, the treated spot is sanded. Following the sanding, the area can be painted with both a base and top coat to complete the process.

The new primer reportedly cures defects in only two to three minutes, while a conventional primer might take up to 30 minutes to cure. The new primer is also eco-efficient because it contains half the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of conventional solvent-based primers. The primer was recognized with an Automotive NewsPACE award earlier this year.

For more information, call 248.948.2253 or visitwww.basf.com.